plato's dialogue euthydemus

And if we knew how to convert stones into gold, the knowledge would be of no value to us, unless we also knew how to use the gold? My fear is that this word 'always' may get us into trouble. Such are the modes in which propositions and terms may be ambiguous.'. But if you will answer, he said, I will make you confess to similar marvels. You, perhaps, but certainly not us. 'What did I think of them?' And certainly they were not far wrong; for the man, Crito, began a remarkable discourse well worth hearing, and wonderfully persuasive regarded as an exhortation to virtue. Whither then shall we go, I said, and to what art shall we have recourse? Always, I replied, when I know, I know with this. Yes, I said; and I take your words to be a sufficient proof that the art of making speeches is not one which will make a man happy. SCENE: The Lyceum. The first is when there is an equal linguistic propriety in several interpretations; the second when one is improper but customary; the third when the ambiguity arises in the combination of elements that are in themselves unambiguous, as in "knowing letters." You are abusive, Ctesippus, said Dionysodorus, you are abusive! What followed, Crito, how can I rightly narrate? Ctesippus said: Quite so, Euthydemus, that is to say, if he who drinks is as big as the statue of Delphi. And have you not admitted that you always know all things with that which you know, whether you make the addition of 'when you know them' or not? If they know how to destroy men in such a way as to make good and sensible men out of bad and foolish ones— whether this is a discovery of their own, or whether they have learned from some one else this new sort of death and destruction which enables them to get rid of a bad man and turn him into a good one—if they know this (and they do know this—at any rate they said just now that this was the secret of their newly-discovered art)—let them, in their phraseology, destroy the youth and make him wise, and all of us with him. 'No, indeed,' I said to him; 'I could not get within hearing of them—there was such a crowd.' For I was beginning to imitate their skill, on which my heart was set. What a miserable man you must be then, he said; you are not an Athenian at all if you have no ancestral gods or temples, or any other mark of gentility. Rouse, revised].In classical times this dialog was also titled The Eristic and was classified as a "refutative" dialog (Diog. 'You would have heard the greatest masters of the art of rhetoric discoursing.' Were they other than the beautiful, or the same as the beautiful? Of all other men, he replied. Compare Aristot. The main argument is between Socrates and the elderly Protagoras, a celebrated sophist and philosopher. I’ll go ahead and quote Euthydemus’ full line of questioning here, since it gives one an idea of how the whole dialogue proceeds: Now Euthydemus, if I remember rightly, began nearly as follows: O Cleinias, are those who learn the wise or the ignorant?[…]. You prate, he said, instead of answering. And have you not admitted that those who do not know are of the number of those who have not? And he who says that thing says that which is? But I hope that you will be of that mind, reverend Euthydemus, I said, if you are really speaking the truth, and yet I a little doubt your power to make good your words unless you have the help of your brother Dionysodorus; then you may do it. Why, you surely have some notion of my meaning, he said. Good, I said, fairest and wisest Cleinias. You then, learning what you did not know, were unlearned when you were learning? The Euthyphro asks, “What is piety?” Euthyphro fails to maintain the successive positions that piety is “what the gods love,” “what the … Dramatic Influence on Plato's Illusion of the Dialogue. But can a father be other than a father? The Euthyphro is a paradigmatic early dialogue of Plato's: it is brief, deals with a question in ethics, consists of a conversation between Socrates and one other person who claims to be an expert in a certain field of ethics, and ends inconclusively. I suppose that is true, I said, if my qualification implied in the words 'that I know' is not allowed to stand; and so I do know all things. A performance of the Euthydemus in an English adaptation. And would not you, Crito, say the same? Euthydemus. Now I should not like the strangers to experience similar treatment; the fear of ridicule may make them unwilling to receive me; and therefore, Crito, I shall try and persuade some old men to accompany me to them, as I persuaded them to go with me to Connus, and I hope that you will make one: and perhaps we had better take your sons as a bait; they will want to have them as pupils, and for the sake of them willing to receive us. Crito answers that he was a speechwriter, which Socrates then calls an “amphibious” class, “one of those whom Prodicus describes as on the border-ground between philosophers and statesmen.” They think highly of themselves because they are knowledgeable of both fields, but Socrates argues that they are worse than either philosophers or statesmen: [I]f philosophy and political action are both good, but tend to different ends, and they participate in both, and are in a mean between them, then they are talking nonsense, for they are worse than either; or, if the one be good and the other evil, they are better than the one and worse than the other; only on the supposition that they are both evil could there be any truth in what they say. Then, I said, you know all things, if you know anything? Socrates: Yes, indeed; he proceeded in a lofty strain to the following effect: Would you rather, Socrates, said he, that I should show you this knowledge about which you have been doubting, or shall I prove that you already have it? And you will admit that the same is the same, and the other other; for surely the other is not the same; I should imagine that even a child will hardly deny the other to be other. Tell me, then, you two, do you not know some things, and not know others? In the middle was Cleinias the young son of Axiochus, who has wonderfully grown; he is only about the age of my own Critobulus, but he is much forwarder and very good-looking: the other is thin and looks younger than he is. Try and examine her well and truly, and if she be evil seek to turn away all men from her, and not your sons only; but if she be what I believe that she is, then follow her and serve her, you and your house, as the saying is, and be of good cheer.”. They claim to be prepared to demonstrate something crucial for human life. Crito: Indeed, Socrates, you do appear to have got into a great perplexity. His name is Cleinias, and he is the son of Axiochus, and grandson of the old Alcibiades, cousin of the Alcibiades that now is. What, of men only, said Ctesippus, or of horses and of all other animals? I said. When they begin to be in earnest their full beauty will appear: let us then beg and entreat and beseech them to shine forth. Wolfgang Polleichtner. I observed that they looked at one another, and both of them laughed; and then Euthydemus said: Those, Socrates, are matters which we no longer pursue seriously; to us they are secondary occupations. Similarly, Plato’s dialogues in general are, to a greater or lesser extent, fictional, despite the device of portraying them as real conversations. And I will first show you what I conceive to be the nature of the task, and what sort of a discourse I desire to hear; and if I do this in a very inartistic and ridiculous manner, do not laugh at me, for I only venture to improvise before you because I am eager to hear your wisdom: and I must therefore ask you and your disciples to refrain from laughing. In classical times this dialog was also titled The Eristic and was classified as a "refutative" dialog (Diog. Upon recollection, I said, indeed I am afraid that we have left out the greatest of them all. EUTHYDEMUS PERSONS OF THE DIALOGUE: Socrates, who is the narrator of the Dialogue. And yet, perhaps, this is one of those ridiculous questions which I am afraid to ask, and which ought not to be asked by a sensible man: for what human being is there who does not desire happiness? Socrates: There were two, Crito; which of them do you mean? said Dionysodorus. You then, learning what you did not know, were unlearned when you were learning? There are also a few epigrams, that is short poems intended as funerary inscriptions or the like, that have been transmitted to us in various ways under Plato's name (some of them are quoted in Diogenes Lærtius' life of Plato).As is the case with the Letters, whether they are actually by Plato has to be decided on a case by case basis. Volume 1 (with 9 dialogues) of a 5 volume edition of Plato by the great English Victorian Greek scholar, Benjamin Jowett. SOCRATES: Perhaps I may have forgotten, and Ctesippus was the real answerer. I must further express my approval of your kind and public-spirited denial of all differences, whether of good and evil, white or black, or any other; the result of which is that, as you say, every mouth is sewn up, not excepting your own, which graciously follows the example of others; and thus all ground of offence is taken away. Ctesippus said: And I, Socrates, am ready to commit myself to the strangers; they may skin me alive, if they please (and I am pretty well skinned by them already), if only my skin is made at last, not like that of Marsyas, into a leathern bottle, but into a piece of virtue. And an indolent man less than an active man? Crito: He was certainly not an orator, and I doubt whether he had ever been into court; but they say that he knows the business, and is a clever man, and composes wonderful speeches. Socrates: Well, and do you not see that in each of these arts the many are ridiculous performers? said Ctesippus; you and I may contradict all the same for that. 'What was that?' And this, perhaps, is even a more simple question than the first, for there can be no doubt of the answer. There is much, indeed, to admire in your words, Euthydemus and Dionysodorus, but there is nothing that I admire more than your magnanimous disregard of any opinion—whether of the many, or of the grave and reverend seigniors—you regard only those who are like yourselves. The main argument is between Socrates and the elderly Protagoras, a celebrated sophist and philosopher. The youth, overpowered by the question blushed, and in his perplexity looked at me for help; and I, knowing that he was disconcerted, said: Take courage, Cleinias, and answer like a man whichever you think; for my belief is that you will derive the greatest benefit from their questions. Will you not take our word that we know all things? And yet I know that I am going to be caught in one of your charming puzzles. Certainly, he said; just as a general when he takes a city or a camp hands over his new acquisition to the statesman, for he does not know how to use them himself; or as the quail-taker transfers the quails to the keeper of them. They are not serious, but, like the Egyptian wizard, Proteus, they take different forms and deceive us by their enchantments: and let us, like Menelaus, refuse to let them go until they show themselves to us in earnest. Crito: What do you say of them, Socrates? Yes, he said, I think that you are quite right. With Plato's "Euthydemus", Thomas Chance solves a long-standing riddle of Platonic studies. Yes, I said, he is my half-brother, the son of my mother, but not of my father. Well then, I said, I can only reply that Iolaus was not my nephew at all, but the nephew of Heracles; and his father was not my brother Patrocles, but Iphicles, who has a name rather like his, and was the brother of Heracles. Now, given the crowd’s reaction and Dionysodorus’ warning, we can already tell what the two Sophists are mainly after, and it’s not wisdom or virtue. Best of men, I said, I am delighted to hear you say so; and I am also grateful to you for having saved me from a long and tiresome investigation as to whether wisdom can be taught or not. And now, I said, I will ask my stupid question: If there is no such thing as error in deed, word, or thought, then what, in the name of goodness, do you come hither to teach? (dialogue) Euthydemus ( Greek: Εὐθύδημος, Euthydemos ), written c. 384 BCE, is a dialogue by Plato which satirizes what Plato presents as the logical fallacies of the Sophists. Do those, said he, who learn, learn what they know, or what they do not know? Again Dionysodorus whispered to me: That, Socrates, is just another of the same sort. In it, Socrates describes to his friend Crito a visit he and various youths paid to two brothers, Euthydemus and Dionysodorus, both of whom were prominent Sophists from Chios and Thurii. What am I to do with them? Then he is a father, and he is yours; ergo, he is your father, and the puppies are your brothers. This was a fairly short dialogue, so we’ll leave it there. And what knowledge ought we to acquire? Exhibit that, and you will confer a great favour on me and on every one present; for the fact is I and all of us are extremely anxious that he should become truly good. O Euthydemus, I said, I have but a dull conception of these subtleties and excellent devices of wisdom; I am afraid that I hardly understand them, and you must forgive me therefore if I ask a very stupid question: if there be no falsehood or false opinion or ignorance, there can be no such thing as erroneous action, for a man cannot fail of acting as he is acting—that is what you mean? And would you be able, Socrates, to recognize this wisdom when it has become your own? For then neither of us says a word about the thing at all? 'Surely,' I said, 'philosophy is a charming thing.' CRITO: Who was the person, Socrates, with whom you were talking yesterday at the Lyceum? But why should I repeat the whole story? There’s also an interesting point where Crito interjects after relating some of Cleinias’ answers: CRITO: And do you mean, Socrates, that the youngster said all this? What do you mean, Dionysodorus? And may there not be a silence of the speaker? my dear sir, no indeed. Then I think you happier in having such a treasure than the great king is in the possession of his kingdom. You can be funny and serious at the same time. and Euthydemus shall tell how many teeth you have. But what appears to me to be more than all is, that this art and invention of yours has been so admirably contrived by you, that in a very short time it can be imparted to any one. 9.1", "denarius") All Search Options [view abbreviations] Home Collections/Texts Perseus Catalog Research Grants Open Source About Help. He is quite young, and we are naturally afraid that some one may get the start of us, and turn his mind in a wrong direction, and he may be ruined. Yes, I do, subject to your correction; for you are the bottom, and Euthydemus is the top, of all my wisdom. Return to the Euthydemus Summary Return to the Plato Library, The Secret Garden - Frances Hodgson Burnett, Uncle Tom's Cabin - Harriet Beecher Stowe. Your visit, therefore, is most happily timed; and I hope that you will make a trial of the young man, and converse with him in our presence, if you have no objection. And knowing is having knowledge at the time? Then, said the other, you do not learn that which he dictates; but he only who does not know letters learns? The Euthydemus shows Socrates among the eristics (those who engage in showy logical disputation). When Ctesippus heard this he got very angry (as a lover well might) and said: Stranger of Thurii—if politeness would allow me I should say, A plague upon you! Cleinias saw me from the entrance as I was sitting alone, and at once came and sat down on the right hand of me, as you describe; and Dionysodorus and Euthydemus, when they saw him, at first stopped and talked with one another, now and then glancing at us, for I particularly watched them; and then Euthydemus came and sat down by the youth, and the other by me on the left hand; the rest anywhere. Front Cover. And these, as I was telling you, are supposed to be the most eminent professors of their time. And do the Scythians and others see that which has the quality of vision, or that which has not? Tell me, he said, Socrates and the rest of you who say that you want this young man to become wise, are you in jest or in real earnest? I observed that they looked at one another, and both of them laughed; and then Euthydemus said: Those, Socrates, are matters which we no longer pursue seriously; to us they are secondary occupations. Socrates: I will tell you; the kingly art was identified by us with the political. Here, anticipating the final move, like a person caught in a net, who gives a desperate twist that he may get away, I said: No, Dionysodorus, I have not. The word was hardly out of his mouth when Dionysodorus took up the argument, like a ball which he caught, and had another throw at the youth. Can there be any doubt that good birth, and power, and honours in one's own land, are goods? Is not that which you would deem your own, he said, that which you have in your own power, and which you are able to use as you would desire, for example, an ox or a sheep—would you not think that which you could sell and give and sacrifice to any god whom you pleased, to be your own, and that which you could not give or sell or sacrifice you would think not to be in your own power? Then I would much rather that you should prove me to have such a knowledge; at my time of life that will be more agreeable than having to learn. Socrates: And what would you say that the kingly art does? Well, Cleinias, but if you have the use as well as the possession of good things, is that sufficient to confer happiness? Certainly, of the knowledge which I have. Socrates: All I know is that I heard these words, and that they were not spoken either by Euthydemus or Dionysodorus. Then after all the wise are the learners and not the unlearned; and your last answer to Euthydemus was wrong. There was such a crowd around you that I could not get within hearing, but I caught a sight of him over their heads, and I made out, as I thought, that he was a stranger with whom you were talking: who was he? And here I offer my old person to Dionysodorus; he may put me into the pot, like Medea the Colchian, kill me, boil me, if he will only make me good. He adds: The two foreign gentlemen, perceiving that you did not know, wanted to explain to you that the word ‘to learn’ has two meanings, and is used, first, in the sense of acquiring knowledge of some matter of which you previously have no knowledge, and also, when you have the knowledge, in the sense of reviewing this matter, whether something done or spoken by the light of this newly-acquired knowledge; the latter is generally called ‘knowing’ rather than ‘learning,’ but the word ‘learning’ is also used; and you did not see, as they explained to you, that the term is employed of two opposite sorts of men, of those who know, and of those who do not know. Is not the honourable honourable and the base base? He would be like a person who pulls away a stool from some one when he is about to sit down, and then laughs and makes merry at the sight of his friend overturned and laid on his back. Cleinias saw me from the entrance as I was sitting alone, and at once came and sat down on the right hand of me, as you describe; and Dionysodorus and Euthydemus, when they saw him, at first stopped and talked with one another, now and then glancing at us, for I particularly watched them; and then Euthydemus came and sat down by the youth, and the other by me on the left hand; the rest anywhere. Hoping to learn, Socrates asks about the topic of their demonstration. Socrates: And will you on this account shun all these pursuits yourself and refuse to allow them to your son? Quite true, I said; and that I have always known; but the question is, where did I learn that the good are unjust? When you were children, and at your birth? It’s a trap! Dionysodorus and Euthydemus, though, are malicious, and do consciously try to embarrass Cleinias and Ctesippus for the entertainment of the crowd. Nay, said Ctesippus, but the question which I ask is whether all things are silent or speak? Crito: Yes, that was what you were saying. They can see to any extent, said Ctesippus. Socrates: He whom you mean, Crito, is Euthydemus; and on my left hand there was his brother Dionysodorus, who also took part in the conversation. Most of their trick relies on equivocation. Now, if philosophy and political action are both good, but tend to different ends, and they participate in both, and are in a mean between them, then they are talking nonsense, for they are worse than either; or, if the one be good and the other evil, they are better than the one and worse than the other; only on the supposition that they are both evil could there be any truth in what they say. Prologue. At any rate they are yours, he said, did you not admit that? Do you know something, Socrates, or nothing? Nor would any other knowledge, whether of money-making, or of medicine, or of any other art which knows only how to make a thing, and not to use it when made, be of any good to us. Plato ( 428/427 BC – 348/347 BC) was a philosopher in Classical Greece. Cleinias, he said, Euthydemus is deceiving you. Fearing that there would be high words, I again endeavoured to soothe Ctesippus, and said to him: To you, Ctesippus, I must repeat what I said before to Cleinias—that you do not understand the ways of these philosophers from abroad. Well, then, I said, I will take away the words 'that I know.'. I suppose that I had best answer you, Dionysodorus, I said, for you will insist on asking—that I pretty well know—out of envy, in order to prevent me from learning the wisdom of Euthydemus. These parts of learning are not serious, and therefore I say that the gentlemen are not serious, but are only playing with you. Yes, he said, I certainly saw him and the mother of the puppies come together. And would you arm Geryon and Briareus in that way? For at last Ctesippus began to throw off all restraint; no question in fact was too bad for him; he would ask them if they knew the foulest things, and they, like wild boars, came rushing on his blows, and fearlessly replied that they did. I dare say, my good Crito, that they may have been spoken by some superior person: that I heard them I am certain. Well, then, answer according to your notion of my meaning. That which has the quality of vision clearly. Socrates: And does the kingly art make men wise and good? Upon what principle? And if a person had wealth and all the goods of which we were just now speaking, and did not use them, would he be happy because he possessed them? Then, before the youth had time to recover his breath, Dionysodorus cleverly took him in hand, and said: Yes, Cleinias; and when the grammar-master dictated anything to you, were they the wise boys or the unlearned who learned the dictation? Or would an artisan, who had all the implements necessary for his work, and did not use them, be any the better for the possession of them?

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